A BRIGHT COPY OF GRIFFIS’ ACCOUNT OF KOREA IN THE ORIGINAL CLOTH

Corea the Hermit Nation.

London: W.H. Allen & Co., 1882.

8vo (214 x 140mm), pp. [2 (blank l.)], xxiii, [1 (blank)], [2 (illustrations, maps and plans)], [2 (part-title, verso blank)], 462; wood-engraved frontispiece, folding colour-printed lithographic map finished by hand in colours, wood-engraved illustrations and maps in the text, 7 full-page, wood-engraved tailpieces; occasional light spotting; original blue colth over bevelled boards, gilt design on upper board, spine lettered and decorated in gilt, grey endpapers; extremities slightly rubbed, fore-edges a little spotted, nonetheless a very bright, clean copy.

£500

Approximately:
US $636€577

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Corea the Hermit Nation.

Checkout now

First British edition. The American orientalist, minister and writer Griffis (1843-1928) was educated at Rutgers University and travelled to Japan in 1870, in the early years of the Meiji period, when Japan was beginning to engage with the West. After four years teaching in Japan, Griffis returned to the United States and studied at New Brunswick Theological Seminary in order to become a minister. He then embarked on a fifty-year career of lecturing, writing and teaching, becoming one of the greatest American experts on Japan, the author of many books on the country and its culture and history, and the leading interpreter of America to Japan. From his earliest days in Japan, while living at Fukui in 1871, Griffis had come into contact with Koreans and Korean culture, and, whilst usually a strong supporter of Japan, he was an advocate of Korea’s policies and positions in its political disputes with Japan.

The work is divided into three parts (‘Ancient and Mediaeval History’, ‘Political and Social Corea’, and ‘Modern and Recent History’), and is prefaced by an extensive bibliography of publications on Korea (pp. [xi]-xvii). Griffis’ introduction states that, ‘My purpose in this work is to give an outline of the history of the Land of Morning Calm – as the natives call their country – from before the Christian era to the present year. As “an honest tale speeds best, being plainly told,” I have made no attempt to embellish the narrative, though I have sought information from sources from within and without Corea, in maps and charts, coins and pottery, the language and art, notes and narratives of eye-witnesses, pencil-sketches, paintings and photographs, the standard histories of Japan and China, the testimony of sailor and diplomatist, missionary and castaway, and the digested knowledge of critical scholars. I have attempted nothing more than a historical outline of the nation and a glimpse at the political and social life of the people’ (p. vi).

Cordier, Sinica, cols 2956-2957.

You may also be interested in...

C[OLOMBO]. A[POTHECARIES]. CO. LTD.

Caryota Urens (Kitul), Botanical Study,

Charles Scowen arrived in Ceylon around 1873 and was initially an assistant to R. Edley, the Commission Agent in Kandy before opening a photographic studio around 1876. By 1885 his photography firm had studios in Colombo and Kandy. Scowen was a later arrival to Ceylon than Skeen and his work is less well-known, but: ‘Much of Scowen’s surviving work displays an artistic sensibility and technical mastery which is often superior to their longer-established competitor. In particular, the botanical studies are outstanding…’ (Falconer, J. and Raheem, I., Regeneration: a reappraisal of photography in Ceylon 1850 –1900, p. 19). In the early 1890s the firm was being run by Mortimer Scowen, a relative of Charles Scowen. By about 1894 the firm’s stock of negatives had been acquired by the ‘Colombo Apothecaries Co Ltd’. This print is likely to have been made in the 1890s from negatives made earlier.

Read more

[YULE, Adam and] James Reid M’GAVIN, editor.

Perils by Sea and Land: a Narrative of the Loss of the Brig Australia by Fire, on her Voyage from Leith to Sydney, with an Account of the Sufferings, Religious Exercises, and Final Rescue of the Crew and Passengers.

First edition in book form. Perils by Sea and Land was first published in the United Secession Magazine, and is an account of the brig Australia, captained by Adam Yule and bound for Sydney, which set sail from Leith on 2 October 1840 with a ‘general cargo of merchandize’, thirteen crew and fifteen passengers. On 29 December, about 600 miles off the Cape of Good Hope, the hold caught fire and Yule soon realised that the ship would have to be abandoned. The long-boat, however, ‘had been converted into a stall for two live bulls, and in attempting to get them over the side, one of them, in the confusion, unfortunately got out of the slings, and ran frantic along the deck. This accident, as may be supposed, greatly increased the general consternation’ (p. 16). The crew and passengers were eventually transferred to the long-boat and a small skiff, wherein seven days were spent at sea before making landfall on the South African coast near the mouth of the Olifants River. The party endured the deaths of two of their number and further days in the wilderness before civilization was eventually reached. Despite Yule’s attribution of every favourable turn of events to divine intervention, the narrative is a compelling one.

Read more