Sententie, uyt-ghesproocken ende ghepronuncieert over Hugo de Groot, ghewesen Pensionaris der Stadt Rotterdam den achthienden May Anno sesthien-hondert neghenthien stilo novo.

’s-Graven-Haghe, Hillebrant Jacobssz., 1619.

4to., ff. [10, last blank], with woodcut arms of the United Provinces on title; later marbled boards.

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Sententie, uyt-ghesproocken ende ghepronuncieert over Hugo de Groot, ghewesen Pensionaris der Stadt Rotterdam den achthienden May Anno sesthien-hondert neghenthien stilo novo.

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One of several editions to appear in the same year, including one in Latin and one in French. In 1618 Grotius and his patron, the Advocate of Holland, Jan van Oldenbarnevelt, had been driven from power by the Stadtholder, Prince Maurice of Orange, who was supported by the Calvinists, bitter opponents of their Arminian sympathies. Tried before a special tribunal, both were found guilty of treason. Oldenbarnevelt was sentenced to death and executed in 1619. Grotius was sentenced to life imprisonment (his sentence is printed in full here) and incarcerated in the castle of Louvestein. He escaped in 1621, concealed in a chest of books with his laundry, and fled to France.

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