The Gunpowder-Treason, with a discourse on the manner of its discovery; and a perfect relation of the proceedings against those horrid conspirators; wherein is contained their examinations, tryals, and condemnations: likewise King James’s speech to both Houses of Parliament, on that occasion; now re-printed …

London, Newcomb, Hills and Kettilby, 1679.

8vo, pp. [4], 58, [2], 72, 191, [1 blank]; separate title-pages; lower edge apparently bumped, chipped and brittle though not affecting text, dusty marks; one or two waterstains, else a good copy in twentieth-century green cloth, red morocco label to spine, gilt, preliminary leaf preserved with annotations in a nineteenth-century hand to recto and armorial bookplate of John Onion to verso, trimmed and corners chipped affecting text, restored, split along gutter.

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The Gunpowder-Treason, with a discourse on the manner of its discovery; and a perfect relation of the proceedings against those horrid conspirators; wherein is contained their examinations, tryals, and condemnations: likewise King James’s speech to both Houses of Parliament, on that occasion; now re-printed …

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Later edition, much expanded with a preface by Thomas Barlow, Bishop of Lincoln (1608/9–1691) and ‘several papers or letters of Sir Everard Digby … never before printed’; first published in 1606 as A true and perfect relation of the proceedings at the several arraignments of the late most barbarous traitors. The letters of Everard Digby, plotter (1578-1606), were discovered in 1675 at the house of Charles Cornwallis, the executor of his son Kenelm Digby’s (1603–1665) estate.

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