History of the Spanish Revolution; commencing with the establishment of the constitutional government of the Cortes, in the year 1812 and brought down to its overthrow by the French arms.

London, Henry Fisher at the Caxton Press, [1823].

8vo, pp. 440, with three lithographed portrait plates, three folding maps (of which two hand-coloured) and a folding plan; plates foxed, some off-setting from maps; contemporary russia, black morocco lettering-piece on spine; slightly rubbed; ownership inscription of A. P. Scott, Corn Market, Oxford, dated 1827 on rear flyleaf; from the library of Ian Robertson (1928–2020).

£250

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First edition of this political history of Spain from the Spanish Constitution of 1812 (also known as the Constitution of Cádiz, 19 March 1812) down to the Battle of Trocadero (31 August 1823) and the execution of Riego (7 November 1823). It seems originally to have been published in parts. According to the preface, the author’s sources included Laborde, Doblado’s Letters from Spain, ‘the Anecdotes of Count Pecchio’ (i.e. Giuseppe Pecchio’s Anecdotes of the Spanish and Portuguese revolutions, 1823), ‘and the still more excellent publication, entitled, “A visit to Spain, by Mr. Quin” ’ (i.e. Michael Quin’s A visit to Spain, 1823).

Little seems to be known about Joseph Hemingway, but he may be identifiable with a man of that name who served with the second battalion of the 84th (York and Lancaster) Regiment of Foot in the Peninsular War.

Alberich 846; Palau 112917.

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