PLATES BY HOLLAR

The Office of the Holy Week according to the Missall and Roman Breviary. Translated out of French with a new and ample Explanation taken out of the Holy Fathers, of the Mysteries, Ceremonies, Gospels, Lessons, Psalms, and of all that belongs to his Office. Enricht with many Figures.

Paris, Printed by the Widow Chrestien. 1670.

8vo., pp. [6], 366, [2], 367-571, 562-578, 589-611, [1], with 8 full-page engraved illustrations by Wenceslaus Hollar, woodcut headpieces and initials; text in Latin and English in parallel columns; a very good copy in nineteenth-century straight-grain red morocco, spine gilt, gilt edges; bookplate of the Irish judge William O’Brien, bought by him at the John Fuller Russell sale, Sotheby’s 1885, for £1 4s; booklabels and stamp to title-page of Milltown Park Library.

£750

Approximately:
US $917€829

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The Office of the Holy Week according to the Missall and Roman Breviary. Translated out of French with a new and ample Explanation taken out of the Holy Fathers, of the Mysteries, Ceremonies, Gospels, Lessons, Psalms, and of all that belongs to his Office. Enricht with many Figures.

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First edition of the French Catholic liturgy in English for the two weeks from Palm Sunday to Quasimodo or Low Sunday, translated and with a dedication and explanatory footnotes by Sir Walter Kirkham Blount.

The plates, engraved by Wenceslas Hollar, are apparently copied from some by Boetius a Bolswert in Jean Bourgeois’s Vitae passionis et mortis Jesu Christi … mysteria (Antwerp, 1622). Blount’s translation was based on one left uncompleted by his father George Blount, and is dedicated to his mother Mary, née Kirkham.

Wing O 150; Pennington I, 78-84.

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BREVIARY,

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