The Political litany, diligently revised; to be said or sung, until the appointed change come, throughout the dominion of England and Wales, and the town of Berwick upon Tweed. By special command.

London, J.D. Dewick for William Hone, 1817.

8vo, pp. 8; a few faint marks, inner bifolium folded at backfold; very good in recent marbled boards, gilt morocco label to upper board.

£125

Approximately:
US $172€147

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The Political litany, diligently revised; to be said or sung, until the appointed change come, throughout the dominion of England and Wales, and the town of Berwick upon Tweed. By special command.

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One of the satirical pamphlets for which the political writer and publisher William Hone (1780-1842) was famously put on trial for blasphemy in December 1817, ‘in one of the great case histories of all blasphemy trials’ (ODNB), the other two being The late John Wilkes’s catechism and The Sinecurists’ creed or belief (both advertised on the title-page here). The trials – a separate one for each publication, held on successive days – attracted enormous publicity. Hone was acquitted at each one, and acclaimed as champion of the people’s rights.

Other editions appeared in the same year, published by Richard Carlile in London, and John Marshall in Newcastle.

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