Ces présentes heures a lusaige de Ro[m]me fure[n]t achevez lan Mil. CCCC. iiii. xx. [et] xviii. le xxii. iour de Aoust pour Symo[n] Vostre Libraire demoura[n]t a Paris a la rue neuve nostre dame a lenseigne Sainct Jehan levangeliste.

Paris, Philippe Pigouchet for Simon Vostre, 22 August 1498.

Small 4to, ff. [72], lettre bâtarde, printed on vellum, large device of Philippe Pigouchet on f. 1r, cut of the anatomical figure on f. 2r and 21 large metalcuts, each page within a full border composed of small metalcuts and border-pieces; large and small capitals and line-fillers supplied in gold on red or blue (or red and blue) grounds, remaining capitals touched with yellow, lightly ruled in red throughout; upper margins trimmed rather close, occasionally just touching uppermost extremity of border, but a very good, fresh copy in mid-twentieth-century brown morocco-backed boards, gilt edges; spine slightly rubbed.

£15000

Approximately:
US $19413€16587

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Ces présentes heures a lusaige de Ro[m]me fure[n]t achevez lan Mil. CCCC. iiii. xx. [et] xviii. le xxii. iour de Aoust pour Symo[n] Vostre Libraire demoura[n]t a Paris a la rue neuve nostre dame a lenseigne Sainct Jehan levangeliste.

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One of the most beautiful printed Books of Hours of the late fifteenth century. Fifteen of the large cuts, all attributed to the Master of the Apocalypse-Rose, belong to Pigouchet’s fine second series of Hours illustrations, first used in 1496. Seven cuts, representing Pigouchet’s third and best series, uniformly conceived with criblé backgrounds, make their first appearance in this edition (see A. W. Pollard, ‘The illustrations in French Books of Hours 1486–1500’, in Bibliographica III, 1897, p. 465; and A. Claudin, Histoire de l’imprimerie en France, II, 1901, pp. 25–44).

The borders are of a stunning richness: Biblical scenes and figures, allegorical figures, fantastic beasts, hunting scenes, and Pigouchet’s extensive series based on the Dance of Death, which fills the borders of quire f.

Provenance: John Thomas Simes (d. 1862), with bookplate; the eccentric Manchester collector Richard Bennett (1849–1911), who collected only manuscripts and incunables, and eschewed volumes above thirteen inches in height, with bookplate (see S. de Ricci, English collectors of books and manuscripts pp. 172–3); John Pierpont Morgan, who acquired the Bennett library in its entirety in 1900 for £140,000, with Pierpont Morgan Library bookplate and release label (sale, Christie’s New York, 8 April 1981, lot 120, to Quaritch).

Hain 8855; Bohatta, Horae 648; Lacombe 59; BMC VIII p. 119; Goff H-394; Bod-inc. H-170.