AFTER PETERLOO

Mr. Hunt’s triumphant entry in Manchester, from Lancaster Gaol.

Nottingham, Ordoyno, [1819].

4to handbill; slightly toned but very good.

£450

Approximately:
US $605€498

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Mr. Hunt’s triumphant entry in Manchester, from Lancaster Gaol.

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Unrecorded handbill reporting on Hunt’s arrival in Manchester on 31 August 1819.

After the Peterloo Massacre on 16 August 1819, Hunt was arrested, charged with seditious conspiracy and transferred to Lancaster Gaol. ‘Bailed, he challenged the competence of the Lancashire grand jury and its foreman Lord Stanley, and mustered popular support in the North-West and London’ (History of Parliament online), passing through Bolton on his way back to Machester – ‘the populace at every place he came to did the utmost to display their voluntary homage’. The present handbill praises Hunt as a ‘tough and faithful instrument’ for reform but warns that ‘discipline is necessary to Reformers’, and in-fighting should be avoided.

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