Carrying Off the Palaces: John Ruskin’s Lost Daguerreotypes.

London, Bernard Quaritch Ltd, 2015.

Small 4to, (250 x 300 mm), pp. xxvi, 406 (including 601 illustrations); cloth-bound with pictorial dust-jacket.

£85

Approximately:
US $111€96

Ship to:

Purchase

Make an enquiry

The inspiration for this book was a remarkable discovery made by the authors at a small country auction in 2006. One lightly regarded lot was a distressed mahogany box crammed with long-lost early photographs. These daguerreotypes were later confirmed as once belonging to John Ruskin, the great 19th-century art critic, writer, artist and social reformer. Moreover, the many scenes of Italy, France and Switzerland included the largest collection of daguerreotypes of Venice in the world and probably the earliest surviving photographs of the Alps.

Core to this book is a fully illustrated catalogue raisonné of the 325 known John Ruskin daguerreotypes. The overwhelming majority of the newly-discovered plates are published here for the first time. There are an additional 276 illustrations in the text and an essay describing the technical procedures used in conserving Ruskin’s photographs. Ten chapters extensively study Ruskin’s photographic endeavours. A chronology, glossary, twenty-page bibliography and comprehensive index complete this handsome hardback book.

Winner of The Apollo Awards 2015: Book of the Year and The Ruskin Society Book Prize.

ISBN 978-0-9563012-7-7

You may also be interested in...

SAPPHO AND OTHERS LANTIER, É[tienne] F[rançois de].

The Travels of Antenor in Greece and Asia: from a Greek Manuscript found at Herculaneum: including some Account of Egypt. Translated from the French … With additional Notes by the English Translator. In three Volumes …

First English edition (first published in French in Paris in ‘An VI de la République’, 1797-8). The Travels of Antenor is a work of fiction (‘ne sont qu’un roman d’imagination’), based ostensibly on an ancient Greek manuscript found at the site, recently discovered, of Herculaneum. The genesis of the story is an extension of its fiction: At the King’s palace and museum at Naples, Lantier meets the Abbé Spalatini and his team, who are engaged in deciphering the site’s ancient manuscripts. Disdaining Antenor, the Abbé allows Lantier to borrow the manuscript, where he finds an autobiography-cum-travel narrative which covers almost the entire spectrum of Greek legend and antiquity through the protagonist’s anecdotes, conversations and travels.

Read more

[THEATRE].

La locanda commedia da rappresentarsi in Firenze nel Teatro di Via del Cocomero nell’autunno dell’anno 1756.

Sole edition, extremely rare (no other copy listed in library catalogues), of this three-act comedy, a notable example of the new Italian comedy inspired by Goldoni. This work appears to echo Goldoni’s La vedova scaltra (1748), while developing the plot and the theme along original trajectories. The most recognizable persona of the servant in the Commedia dell’Arte, Arlecchino, for example, features here in the unusual role of landlord, and the dynamics of the comedy of errors involve such characters as an English merchant, a German colonel, a French gentlemen, each linguistically marked with mock-national traits in the dialogues.

Read more