Essays on economics.

London and New York, Macmillan & Co., 1905.

8vo, pp. xi, [1] blank, [4], 280; a good copy, rebound in recent buckram, spine lettered gilt, inscribed ‘To J. David Thompson from the Author’ in pencil on the still-present original front flyleaf.

£100

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Essays on economics.

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First edition of Herbert Stanley Jevons’ essays, on pleasure and pain, utility, labour, exchange and capital, rent, and production, inscribed to his Chicago associate J.D. Thompson. In the introduction he mentions his father’s work in discussion of ‘the hedonic school’ of economics, whose philosophy he invokes in his opening declaration: ‘The motive which underlies almost all the actions of men is a desire to experience pleasure and avoid pain’ (p. 1). Herbert classifies his own argument as ‘characteristic of the hedonic school’, but with a more than characteristically mathematical treatment. Motivated by consideration for ‘the general reader’ he uses ‘graphic illustrations’ rather than algebraic equations (pp. 14-15).

Batson, p. 140; Menger, col. 467.

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