REVOLUTION FOR CHILDREN

The History of France, from the earliest Period, comprehending every interesting and remarkable Occurrence in the Annals of that Monarchy to its Abolition in September, 1792. By the Rev. Mr. Cooper. Embellished with Copper-Plate Cuts, and designed principally for Use of young Ladies and Gentlemen. The second Edition.

London, E. Newbery, 1792.

12mo, pp. [6], 172, with an engraved frontispiece (a monument to Louis XIV), and 5 further engraved plates(‘The Sicilian Massacre’, ‘Death of the Duke of Guise’, ‘The Dutch Council of State’, ‘Richelieu’s Journey to Court’, and ‘Conti forcing the Passage of the Alps’); light offsetting from plates, the odd small stain; but a very good copy in the original quarter green-stained vellum with marbled sides, boards made from printer’s waste with the date 1796 visible; corners bumped and worn, spine chipped at head, rear hinge cracked.

£300

Approximately:
US $389€356

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The History of France, from the earliest Period, comprehending every interesting and remarkable Occurrence in the Annals of that Monarchy to its Abolition in September, 1792. By the Rev. Mr. Cooper. Embellished with Copper-Plate Cuts, and designed principally for Use of young Ladies and Gentlemen. The second Edition.

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Second edition of this history of France for children, revised from the first edition of 1786 to include the events of the French Revolution.

The chapter devoted to the reign of Louis XIV is in fact entirely rewritten, expanded from three and a half pages in 1786 (largely devoted to Necker and American commerce) to twenty-two pages here. Johnson, a printer who also wrote numerous children’s books for Newbery, was in evident if guarded sympathy with the Revolution, outlining the institutional despotism of the monarchy, the growth of disaffection, the storming of the Bastille, the Federation of 14 July, the escape and then capture of Louis XVI, and the National Convention of September 1792. At the end Johnson leaves the King ‘a close prisoner’ – he was to be executed in January.

Despite successive events the work did not receive a further edition, and was still evidently being bound for retail in the mid 1790s.

Gumuchian 1854; Roscoe J83(2); Welsh 194.

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