THE SUPERB LITTLECOTE COPY

Miscellanies in Prose and Verse …

Oxford Printed; and delivered by Mr. Dodsley …, Mr. Clements in Oxford, and Mr. Frederick in Bath. 1750.

Large 8vo., pp. vi, [ix]-lv, [1], 405, [1]; a splendid copy in contemporary full red morocco, gilt, with contrasting morocco labels, all edges gilt.

£4500

Approximately:
US $5921€5215

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First edition, printed on ‘royal’ paper; a subscriber’s copy, from the library of Edward Popham of Littlecote, with later Popham bookplate and label.

Boswell records Thomas Warton’s observations on Mary Jones (1707-1778): ‘Miss Jones lived at Oxford, and was often of our parties. She was a very ingenious poetess, and published a volume of poems; and, on the whole, was a most sensible, agreeable, and amiable woman. She was sister of the Reverend River Jones, Chanter of Christ Church cathedral at Oxford, and Johnson used to call her the Chantress. I have heard him often address her in this passage from “Il Penseroso”: Thee, Chantress, oft the woods among I woo, &c. She died unmarried.’

Foxon, p. 391.

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