Juvenal’s sixteen Satyrs or, a Survey of the Manner and Actions of Mankind. With Arguments, marginall Notes, and Annotations clearing the obscure Places out of the History, Lawes and Ceremonies of the Romans … London, Printed for Humphrey Moseley … 1647.

London, Printed for Humphrey Moseley … 1647.

8vo., pp. [16], 287, [1], with an additional engraved title-page by Thomas Rawlins and a facing engraved frontispiece portrait of Stapylton by William Marshall; a very good copy, bound without the final errata leaf in early mottled calf, rebacked and recornered, gilt edges.

£750

Approximately:
US $836€852

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Juvenal’s sixteen Satyrs or, a Survey of the Manner and Actions of Mankind. With Arguments, marginall Notes, and Annotations clearing the obscure Places out of the History, Lawes and Ceremonies of the Romans … London, Printed for Humphrey Moseley … 1647.

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First edition of the first complete translation into English of Juvenal’s satires; the first six satires had been published in 1644 and were slightly revised here.

‘I have for my Country’s sake taught him our Language’, writes Stapylton, casting satire as a rectifier of manners, but it was not until the Augustan poets of the eighteenth-century that Juvenal exerted his most lasting influence on English literature.

Raised as a Catholic, and an enthusiatic royalist during the Civil War, Stapylton had already published translations from Virgil and Pliny; he later turned playwright, but his rather slight productions, with plots from classical sources, have long been forgotten.

Wing J 1291.

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