Aglaja. Romantische und historische Erzählungen. Nach dem Russischen des Karamzin herausgegeben von Ferdinand von Biedenfeld.

Leipzig, Brockhaus, 1819.

Small 8vo, pp. 16, 272; in the original printed boards, worn and discoloured; with the small stamp of the Fürstliche Hofbibliothek Donaueschingen on verso of title.


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First appearance of a collection of eight prose pieces by Karamzin (1766–1826) in German translation. Although the work takes the title of the first Russian literary almanac, Aglaia, published by Karamzin in two volumes, 1794–5, it is actually a selection of pieces by Karamzin taken both from Aglaia and from his last journal, Vestnik Evropy, 1802–1803. The pieces include ‘Athenian Life’ (1795), ‘Sierra Morena’ (1795), ‘Martha the Governor’ (1803), and ‘A Flower on the grave of my Agathon’ (1793).

Goedeke X, 280, 10. Very rare; OCLC records a single copy in Strasbourg.

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