Book Lovers’ London.

London, Metro Publications, 2015.

8vo, (215 x 150 mm), pp. 340 (including over 100 full colour photos and area maps); paperback.

£13

Approximately:
US $16€14

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Fifth edition. Book Lovers’ London has established itself as an essential reference tool for those wanting to enjoy the literary delights of the capital. It contains reviews of over six hundred bookshops, including Quaritch.

The guide also suggests less obvious places for bookworms to explore including the best markets, charity shops, auctions and fairs. Sections on London’s libraries and archives, as well as museums, walks, venues and courses wrap the book up.

ISBN 978-1-902910-49-9

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