A Sermon preached at St. Pauls March 27. 1640. Being the Anniversary of His Majesties happy Inauguration to his Crowne … London, Printed by Edward Griffin. 1640.

London, Printed by Edward Griffin. 1640

Small 4to., pp. [2], 59, [1], wanting the initial blank; cut close at the top shaving some headlines, H2-3 torn across and mended without loss of text, else a good copy in recent boards.

£350

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First edition of ‘a significant Accession day sermon’ (Oxford DNB) by the poet and royal chaplain Henry King, at this time Dean of Rochester, afterwards Bishop of Chichester. This sermon is a paean to the sovereign power of the King, taking as its text Jeremiah 1:10 (‘Behold, I have this day set thee over the Nations’).

The final prayer seems almost to foretell the events of the next decade. ‘And when the sad Day comes wherein He [the King] must exchange This Kingdom for a Better; Let His Crown of Gold be changed into a Crown of Glory.’

STC 14970; Keynes 54.

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