Die glückliche Nation, oder der Staat von Felizien. Ein Muster der vollkommensten Freyheit unter der unbedingten Herrschaft der Gesetze. Aus dem Französischen. Erster [– Zweiter] Theil.

Leipzig, Voss, 1794.

Two vols, small 8vo, pp. [2], 542 + engraved frontispiece; [2], 484; small inkstamps on versos of title-pages; ownership stamp ‘F’ and some soiling to the title in vol. II; light browning and offsetting throughout, more so to the final few leaves in vol. I, but still a good copy in recent marbled boards.

£2750

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Die glückliche Nation, oder der Staat von Felizien. Ein Muster der vollkommensten Freyheit unter der unbedingten Herrschaft der Gesetze. Aus dem Französischen. Erster [– Zweiter] Theil.

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First edition in German, originally published as L’Heureuse Nation, ou Relation du gouvernement des Féliciens, peuple souverainement libre et heureux sous l’empire absolu des lois in 1792. Le Mercier de la Rivière (1720–1793/4) was a colleague of Quesnay and Mirabeau, whose physiocratic views he shared. This utopia, according to Daire, is a variation of the material in Le Mercier’s Théorie du despotisme légal and De l’Ordre naturel et essentiel des sociétés politiques.

The present German translation is extremely rare: KVK locates the Wolfenbüttel copy only, and there is no copy in NUC, OCLC or RLIN, Einaudi, Goldsmiths’ or Kress; for the first edition of 1792, see Einaudi 3304, INED 2790, Negley, Utopian Literature, 774, and Quérard V, 140.

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