Historiarum ab urbe condita libri qui supersunt, cum omnium epitomis, ac deperditorum fragmentis, ad optimas editiones castigati. Edinburgh, Thomas & Walter Ruddiman for G. Hamilton, A.

Kincaid, & J. Brown, 1751.

4 vols, large 12mo, pp. pp. I: [8], 491, [1 (blank)], II: [2], 552, III: [2], 511, [1 (blank)], IV: [2], 457, [136 (index)]; an excellent set in contemporary red morocco, borders triple-filleted in gilt, spine richly gilt in compartments, gilt morocco lettering-pieces and volume numbers, turn-ins roll-tooled in gilt, edges gilt, marbled endpapers, ribbon place-markers; top-edges dust-stained, a few small marks; vol. I front free endpaper stamped by Toovey, bookplate of Maurice Baring to upper pastedowns, bookplate of a modern private collector with pencil acquisition note to flyleaf (‘bought from Frank Maggs 1952').

£1200

Approximately:
US $1338€1364

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Historiarum ab urbe condita libri qui supersunt, cum omnium epitomis, ac deperditorum fragmentis, ad optimas editiones castigati. Edinburgh, Thomas & Walter Ruddiman for G. Hamilton, A.

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A very attractive set of the first Ruddiman edition. One of the last works prepared by Thomas Ruddiman (1674–1757), this ‘superb edition of Livy’ (ODNB) was highly praised for its accuracy and is a fine testament both to his classical scholarship and to his printing house. The son of a Banffshire farmer, Ruddiman excelled in literary Edinburgh, establishing his own printing business in 1712, serving as Advocates Librarian (where he greatly expanded the library and was succeeded by David Hume), and publishing works of classical scholarship ranging from the Rudiments of the Latin Tongue, the standard schoolbook on grammar throughout the eighteenth century, to the Grammaticae latinae institutiones, the authoritative text for scholars.

From the library of the writer Maurice Baring (1874–1945); only two other sets have appeared at auction since his death.

ESTC N13441.

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