Johan Lockes oförgripelige tankar om werldslig regerings rätta ursprung/gräntsor och ändamål.

Stockholm, Kongl. Tryckeriet, 1726.

8vo, pp. [viii], 382, [2]; title-page printed in red and black; a few pale stains on p. 1, but a very good copy in contemporary quarter calf and marbled boards, spine blind-tooled in four compartments; corners rubbed; two contemporary manuscript inscriptions on front free endpaper.

£650

Approximately:
US $894€767

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First edition in Swedish. The first translation into Swedish of Locke’s Two Treatises of Government, this edition – of the Second treatise – was translated, following order of the Swedish Ricksdag, by Hans Harmens from Mazel’s 1691 French edition. It was only the second time that any of Locke’s work had been translated into Swedish. Significantly, the Ricksdag’s interests focussed on the part of Locke’s work which addressed the topics of natural rights and the social contract.

Attig 216; Yolton 60.

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