Account of the proceedings at a general meeting of the London Corresponding Society, convened by public advertisement, and held in an inclosed field, behind the long room, Borough Road, St George’s Fields, on Monday, the 29th of June, 1795. Citizen John Gale Jones in the chair. Price two pence.

[London, s.n., 1795].

8vo, pp. 16; some dustsoiling and light browning, but not obtrusive; stamp of the Green Library at Jews’ College, London on title-page; in recent green cloth, spine lettered in gilt.

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Account of the proceedings at a general meeting of the London Corresponding Society, convened by public advertisement, and held in an inclosed field, behind the long room, Borough Road, St George’s Fields, on Monday, the 29th of June, 1795. Citizen John Gale Jones in the chair. Price two pence.

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Sole edition of this account of a meeting of the radical London Corresponding Society, under the chairmanship of the orator John Gale Jones (1769-1838). This was the first meeting of the Society for more than a year, largely due to the 1794 treason trials which had targeted some of its leading members; after an initial address to the meeting, there are two speeches by Jones, one to the nation, and one to the king. The former emphasises the Society’s principal aim, which is not violent revolution but parliamentary and constitutional reform, as well as universal suffrage, especially in the light of the current ‘cruel and disastrous war, [where] gaunt famine stalks along your streets, and haggard wretchedness assails you in every shape’. The address to the King warns him of the advice of his government: ‘if you have not an honest minister, that will dare to speak the truth, the people should instruct their sovereign, and save him from destruction! It is time that you should discern your friends and detect your enemies’.

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