At a general meeting of the London Corresponding Society, held at the Globe Tavern Strand; on Monday the 20th day of January, 1794. Citizen John Martin, in the chair. The following address to the people of Great Britain and Ireland, was read and agreed to.

[London, s.n. 1794].

8vo, pp. 8; uncut and unbound, a single sheet; clean and fresh, with the ownership signature of John Williams, dated 10th June (?) 1794 at head of title.

£300

Approximately:
US $409€349

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At a general meeting of the London Corresponding Society, held at the Globe Tavern Strand; on Monday the 20th day of January, 1794. Citizen John Martin, in the chair. The following address to the people of Great Britain and Ireland, was read and agreed to.

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First edition, first issue. A very good copy of this important address to the people from the London Corresponding Society, shortly before the treason trials which were to interrupt the Society’s workings for over a year. In the context of the war with revolutionary France, the address points out the effective suspension of Magna Carta, habeas corpus, and other fundamental rights, and promises that the Society’s committee will meet daily to observe and report on the proceedings of parliament and the actions of the government. The final page presents 17 resolutions, many to do with ongoing prosecutions of members of the Society, including Citizens Muir and Palmer: ‘May their sentence be speedily reversed, and Botany-Bay be peopled with a colony of real criminals’.

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