Thousands of Frenchmen dead for resistance.

Lithograph in colour, 9¾ x 15 in (25 x 37.5 cm); Rubbed and creased in margins; inscription on verso ‘London District Cttee C.P.'.

£75

Approximately:
US $93€84

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Thousands of Frenchmen dead for resistance.

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This poster, along with two others designed by Louvat in 1944, was produced by the French Forces of the Interior (FFI), a name used by Charles de Gaulle for the French Resistance movement towards the end of the Second World War. In June 1944, the FFI was involved in the Allied invasion of Normandy and suffered heavy casualties. They were consequently ordered to consolidate on 23 June 1944 under the command of General Marie Pierre Koenig (Marston, Counterinsurgency in Modern Warfare, p. 87). The FFI aided other Allied troops to advance through France and liberate Paris by subverting German efforts, capturing towns, bridges and villages as well as providing intelligence on German movements.

The inscription on the verso indicates that this poster was held by the London District Committee Communist Party. In1950, the Communist Party of Great Britain was divided into residential and industrial branches. By 1951, the London district had over 8,000 members (gcu.ac.uk).

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