Photographic Views of the Island of Malta.

[Circa 1860.]

Nine multi-part albumen-print panoramas, various sizes (as listed 1 –9 below), and one individual albumen print (no. 10), each with landmarks identified in ink and sections numbered in pencil on rectos, some fading and a few minor flaws in the surfaces of prints but generally very good, linen-backed and bound together in half maroon morocco, ruled gilt, with gilt-lettered title label on the upper cover, somewhat rubbed at extremities and some staining to covers, not affecting images, approx. 9 x 13 inches (23.1 x 33.2 cm.).

£2000

Approximately:
US $2472€2220

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Photographic Views of the Island of Malta.

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Photographers were active in Malta from an early date and George Wilson Bridges attempted joining two architectural views to form a panorama there, aided by the Rev. Calvert Jones, in 1846. By the second half of the 1850s James Robertson and Felice Beato had started selling multi-part albumen-print panoramas there. It was to become a popular genre for depicting the island, but it is rare to see such a comprehensive documentation of the island’s notable architecture and seascape as here. The majority of the identifications refer to military buildings suggesting these may have been the work of a trained army photographer such as a member of the Royal Engineers.

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