Sobranie istoricheskikh rabot’.

St Petersburg, S. Skirmunt, 1906.

8vo, pp. [4], 456; small mark to title-page; a very good copy, in recent cloth, leaf edges trimmed.

£450

Approximately:
US $630€507

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First edition thus, a Russian collected edition of three works, Class War in France 1848-1850; The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte and Engels’ Revolution and Counter-Revolution in Germany. The works are translated from the original German, and edited by V. Bazarov and I. Stepanov. The collection also includes an introduction to Class War by Engels, and a commentary on Revolution by Karl Kautsky, which first appeared in the German edition.

I. A most important work summing up the results of the 1848-49 French revolution, consisting of a series of articles written for the Neue Rheinische Zeitung Politisch-ökonomische Revue  between January and October 1850.
II. From a starting point of November 9, 1799, when Napoleon Bonaparte declared himself dictator, Marx examines the influence of different social interests during the political struggles, focussing on the disparity between the apparent and actual social situation. It was written between December 1851 and March 1852 and first published in Die Revolution, 1852, New York.
III. Looking at the situation in Germany after 1848, and the idea of German unification. Marx had been asked in the summer of 1851 by Charles Anderson Dana, managing editor of the New York Tribune, to write a series of articles on the German Revolution. Marx delegated responsibility to Engels.

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