Autograph letter, signed (‘Gallway’), in French, to an unnamed English statesman, sending greetings and referring to regimental dispositions.

Turin, 24 December/3 January 1695/6

4to (215 x 165 mm), four pages (two of text, one blank, the final page with the endorsement ‘From Lord Galway’), ink on paper; sometime folded.

£150

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Autograph letter, signed (‘Gallway’), in French, to an unnamed English statesman, sending greetings and referring to regimental dispositions.

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A Huguenot exile from France, Massue de Ruvigny served in the English army and was created Viscount Galway in 1692 (elevated to an earldom in 1697). In 1694 he was appointed commander of the English auxiliary forces in Piedmont, with credentials as envoy extraordinary to the court of Turin, but was outmanoeuvred diplomatically by the duke, who concluded a treaty with the French in August 1696, whereupon Galway withdrew into the Milanese (see DNB).

From the library of C. R. Boxer, acquired by him from Maggs in November 1966.

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