Autograph letter, signed (‘Gallway’), in French, to an unnamed English statesman, sending greetings and referring to regimental dispositions.

Turin, 24 December/3 January 1695/6

4to (215 x 165 mm), four pages (two of text, one blank, the final page with the endorsement ‘From Lord Galway’), ink on paper; sometime folded.

£150

Approximately:
US $195€176

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Autograph letter, signed (‘Gallway’), in French, to an unnamed English statesman, sending greetings and referring to regimental dispositions.

Checkout now

A Huguenot exile from France, Massue de Ruvigny served in the English army and was created Viscount Galway in 1692 (elevated to an earldom in 1697). In 1694 he was appointed commander of the English auxiliary forces in Piedmont, with credentials as envoy extraordinary to the court of Turin, but was outmanoeuvred diplomatically by the duke, who concluded a treaty with the French in August 1696, whereupon Galway withdrew into the Milanese (see DNB).

From the library of C. R. Boxer, acquired by him from Maggs in November 1966.

You may also be interested in...

THE FIRST ENGLISH CHURCH AT DINAN C., E. H.

On the occasion of a Bazaar held in aid of Funds required for the Completion of the first English Church at Dinan, which was begun by the Rev. W. Watson, in 1868. .

‘A Church Bazaar takes place to-day, / And for all aid we humbly pray / Tho’ many have giv’n with liberal hands, / A heavy debt against us stands ....’ Dinan, in Britanny, was popular with English visitors for health or leisure, according to the poem, and for many years English services had been held in a small room. Now a brave vicar had started to build an English church, but had not lived to see it finished. ‘The work he left so well begun, / We surely must not leave undone!’ The church was finished in 1870.

Read more

SWINBURNE, Algernon Charles.

Ode on the Proclamation of the French Republic, September 4th, 1870 ...

First edition. On 4 Septemeber 1879, two days after the final capitulation of the French army at Sedan and the surrender of Napoleon III to the King of Prussia, the republican deputies at Paris proclaimed the end of the imperial dynasty and the foundation of the provisional government that was to become the Third Republic. Swinburne’s celebratory Ode, dedicated to Victor Hugo, was ‘thrown off at a heat on the arrival of the news – written, copied, and despatched in two days’ (Swinburne to Charles Howell, 9 September 1870, quoted by Wise). The poem was afterwards reprinted in Songs of Two Nations (1875). Wise 52.

Read more