THE ‘SCOTTISH’ SYMPHONY

Symphonie No. 3, componirt und Ihrer Majestät der Königin Victoria von England zugeeignet … Partitur, Op. 56.

Leipzig, Breitkopf & Härtel, [1843].

8vo, pp. [4], 240; plate no. 6823, lithographed title-page, engraved music; some light spotting throughout, small water-stain to upper margin towards end; contemporary ownership signature to title and discreet stamp of the Carlsbader Musikverein at regular intervals; a good copy in contemporary half roan, spine lettered gilt, a little rubbed.

£1500

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First edition of Mendelssohn’s ‘Scottish’ Symphony. It was first conceived when Mendelssohn visited Scotland during 1829, but the composer only began work in earnest ten years later.

The first performance took place in Leipzig on 3 March 1842; after its London première on 13 June Mendelssohn dedicated the work to Queen Victoria. The public reception in London was most enthusiastic with Mendelssohn receiving storms of applause not only at his own concerts but also at the concerts which he attended.

Hirsch M.287; P. W. Jones, Catalogue of the Mendelssohn Papers in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, vol. III, Tutzing, 1989, no. 784.

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