Designs for Gates and Rails suitable to Parks, Pleasure Grounds, Balconys &c, also some Design for Trellis Work, on 27 Plates.

London, Published by J. Taylor, at the Architectural Library …, [c. 1805].

Large 8vo (235 x 140 mm.), engraved throughout, title-page and 26 plates (no. 2-27); a very good copy in a recent pastiche binding of calf backed green marbled boards, vellum corners, modest gilt spine with red morocco label.

£675

Approximately:
US $945€761

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First edition of this charming pattern book of garden designs by Charles Middleton which concentrates on gates, rustic fences and trelliswork. Middleton was a pupil of William Paine, and rather than finding success as a building architect he produced a number of fine architectural pattern books.

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