Redchurch Street/Bethnal Green Road, Tower Hamlets,

June 2004

Pigment print on fibre-based paper, 10 x 10 inches (25.4 x 25.4 cm.), signed, titled, dated and numbered 5/10 in pencil on verso.

£600 + VAT

Approximately:
US $764€684

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Redchurch Street/Bethnal Green Road, Tower Hamlets,

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WITH CHARMING PLATES HOWITT, Samuel.

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