Élémens de la Philosophie rurale.

The Hague, ‘chez les Libraires associés’, 1767.

Small 8vo, pp. [6], cvi, 340 + errata leaf; with a folding engraved table of the Tableau économique; A4 a cancel; occasional pencil annotations, but a good copy in contemporary mottled calf, rebacked, original spine preserved, marbled edges.

£2750

Approximately:
US $3529€3014

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Élémens de la Philosophie rurale.

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First edition. The Élémens is a slightly abridged version of the Philosophie rurale (1763), ‘the first of the four text-books of physiocrat orthodoxy’ (Schumpeter, p. 225). Linguet’s Théorie des loix civiles had appeared shortly before this work, and in the Discours préliminaire, Mirabeau presents the basic principles of economic science which, he says, will defeat those put forward by Linguet.

Einaudi 3948; Goldsmiths’ 10275; Higgs 3977; INED 3197; Kress 647; Mattioli 2434.

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