with readings and music for the feast of St. Clement (23 November); a complete vellum leaf, double columns of 37 lines written in two sizes of an early gothic liturgical script, dark brown ink, ruled lightly with plummet, 2-line initials in red, rubrics, neumes on four-line staves; recovered from a binding and with consequent creasing and staining, but generally in very good condition and entirely legible. 332 x 230 mm (written space 315 x 190 mm)

France or Germany, late 12th century.

£975

Approximately:
US $1274€1146

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with readings and music for the feast of St. Clement (23 November); a complete vellum leaf, double columns of 37 lines written in two sizes of an early gothic liturgical script, dark brown ink, ruled lightly with plummet, 2-line initials in red, rubrics, neumes on four-line staves; recovered from a binding and with consequent creasing and staining, but generally in very good condition and entirely legible. 332 x 230 mm (written space 315 x 190 mm)

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The final stage in the accurate placement of musical notation was the introduction of 4-line staves, and they came to be used in almost all music books from the thirteenth century onwards. The present fragment is a relatively early example of their use.

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