Journal de voyage en Italie, par la Suisse & l’Allemagne, en 1580 & 1581.

Rome, and sold in Paris, Le Jay, 1774.

4to, p. [viii], liv, 416; with engraved portrait of Montaigne by St Aubin, engraved vignette by Papillon at the head of the first chapter, typographical head-pieces; the odd spot, but a very good, fresh, wide-margined copy in contemporary speckled polished calf, gilt armorial stamps on sides, panelled spine gilt with fleurons, morocco lettering-piece; joints cracked but holding, spine rubbed with a crack and a small chip at head, edges a little worn; ex libris Kenneth Rapoport to the front paste-down.

£3000

Approximately:
US $3885€3466

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Journal de voyage en Italie, par la Suisse & l’Allemagne, en 1580 & 1581.

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First edition of Montaigne’s travel journal, published nearly two centuries after the completion of the work in manuscript.

Between 1580 and 1581 Montaigne undertook a long journey through France, Switzerland, Germany and Italy. The value of his abundant observations, especially his remarks on the Italian towns he much loved, is heightened by the chronology of the journey: its occurrence between the 1580 and the 1588 editions of the Essays have encouraged critics to see this trip as the ‘long and meditative journey’ which favoured the production of a wholly original and personal corpus.

Tchemerzine VIII, 445.

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