Journal de voyage en Italie, par la Suisse & l’Allemagne, en 1580 & 1581.

Rome, and sold in Paris, Le Jay, 1774.

4to, p. [viii], liv, 416; with engraved portrait of Montaigne by St Aubin, engraved vignette by Papillon at the head of the first chapter, typographical head-pieces; the odd spot, but a very good, fresh, wide-margined copy in contemporary speckled polished calf, gilt armorial stamps on sides, panelled spine gilt with fleurons, morocco lettering-piece; joints cracked but holding, spine rubbed with a crack and a small chip at head, edges a little worn; ex libris Kenneth Rapoport to the front paste-down.

£3000

Approximately:
US $4001€3426

Make an enquiry

First edition of Montaigne’s travel journal, published nearly two centuries after the completion of the work in manuscript.

Between 1580 and 1581 Montaigne undertook a long journey through France, Switzerland, Germany and Italy. The value of his abundant observations, especially his remarks on the Italian towns he much loved, is heightened by the chronology of the journey: its occurrence between the 1580 and the 1588 editions of the Essays have encouraged critics to see this trip as the ‘long and meditative journey’ which favoured the production of a wholly original and personal corpus.

Tchemerzine VIII, 445.

You may also be interested in...

THE POPE AS ANTICHRIST DU ROSIER, Simon.

Antithesis Christi et Antichristi, videlicet Papae.

Rare edition of this satirical attack on the Catholic Church and the Pope by the Protestant minister Simon Du Rosier (or Rosarius), first published in Wittemberg in 1521. An excellent example of the ‘antithesis genre’, of which Luther’s Passional Christi und Antichristi is the most famous expression, Du Rosier’s work is illustrated by a series of woodcuts, attributed to Bernard Salomon after Lucas Cranach, which cleverly juxtapose the life of Christ with the luxury and dissolution of the Pope in order to back the Lutheran tenet that the Pope is the Antichrist.

Read more

FIRST STAR ATLAS PICCOLOMINI, Alessandro.

Della sfera del mondo ... divisa in libri quattro ... Delle stelle fisse, libro uno con le sue figure, e con le sue tavole ... Editione tertia.

A collected edition, using the same woodcuts, of two companion works which had earlier appeared independently in 1540. Both are in the vernacular, by which Piccolomini sought to extend scientific knowledge beyond the university confines. The first is his treatise on the sphere of the universe; the second – more significant – is his book on the fixed stars with 48 star maps. ‘This modest book was, in fact, the first printed star atlas. That is, it was the first printed set of maps of the stars, as distinct from simple pictures of the constellations such as illustrated the various editions of Hyginus. Of equal importance was Piccolomini’s pioneer use of letters to identify the stars – a practice later adopted with some modification by Bayer and, through him, by all modern astronomers. At the bottom of each map is a scale of degrees, correct for that particular map. The words ‘PARTE VERSO IL POLO’ on each map indicate the direction of the equatorial pole, and the words ‘VERSO DOVE’ and ‘DONDE,’ meaning ‘toward which’ and ‘from which,’ indicate the direction of daily rotation of the celestial sphere … The star magnitudes 1-4, are well graduated. The most notable stars in each constellation are identified by consecutive Latin letters, ‘A’ representing the most important star (usually the brightest)’ (The Sky Explored, p. 200).
 
Adams P1108; BL STC Italian p. 514.

Read more