Agricultural systems of middle Europe: a symposium.

New York, Macmillan, 1933

8vo, pp. xix, [1], 405; a clean copy, bound in the original cloth; no dust-jacket.

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First edition. The countries discussed in this symposium are: Austria, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Roumania, and Yugoslavia. All of the papers included in this volume provide valuable insight into post-war agricultural economics, and all are written by former state ministers of agriculture or high officials in national agricultural departments in their respective countries.

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