Reichstagung in Nürnberg 1934.

Berlin, Vaterlaendischer Verlag C. A. Weller, 1934.

Folio, pp. 412, on gloss paper, illustrated with more than 200 black and white photographs, many of them full or half-page, colour frontispiece; first and last leaves and endpapers very lightly foxed, else fine, in the original blue cloth gilt, with the original dustjacket, preserved in the original cardboard slipcase, title inkstamped to box.

£250

Approximately:
US $336€276

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Reichstagung in Nürnberg 1934.

Checkout now

First edition. A handsome substantially photographic tribute to the 1934 Nazi party rally at Nuremberg, aiming to display the physical and military strength of the new Germany both to the German nation and the rest of the world. The numerous images cover all aspects of the rally, including images of the leaders, the reception of the world press, different factions of the Nazi party including Hitler Youth, the SA and SS, and marchers, as well as the enthusiastic crowd and images of the celebrations.

Seizing upon Nuremberg’s historical role as centre of command, some images of traditional kingly and imperial garb are included, tacitly showing that Hitler is following in a legacy of legitimate rule.

You may also be interested in...

[FRANCE and ITALY.]

A collection of manuscript and printed material pertaining to French territorial ambitions in Italy.

A collection of memoranda concerning French ambitions in the Italian peninsula during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.

Read more

‘THE MOST SEDITIOUS BOOK THAT EVER WAS WRITTEN’ ROBERT, Southey.

Wat Tyler. A dramatic poem …

First edition of Southey’s republican verse drama, written at Oxford in three days in 1794. The manuscript had been left with Thomas Spence in prison for possible publication, but Spence had misgivings. Many years later ‘a mischievous publisher obtained a copy … and printed it. The publication was enormously successful, and was acutely embarrassing to a poet laureate, although he defended himself forcefully’, arguing ‘that his basic convictions had never changed’ (ODNB).

Read more