or Church of England Man’s Divine Library: being an universal Illustration, Commentary, Exposition, and Paraphrase on the Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments [etc. etc.] … By Paul Wright, D. D.– F.S.A … Embellished with a numerous Set of elegant Copper-Plate Engravings, more highly finished than those given with any other Work of the Kind whatever …

London: Printed for Alex. Hogg … [1784-5.]

Folio, pp. [8], xvi, [9]-47, 56-417, [3], with a frontispiece and 35 engraved plates by numerous artists (a couple slightly foxed, one with a ink blot); final leaf of subscribers; a good copy in modern half morocco, old calf spine laid down; a subscriber’s copy, signed ‘Thomas Weston’ on the title-page and frontispiece, and dated May 1784.

£950

Approximately:
US $1231€1053

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or Church of England Man’s Divine Library: being an universal Illustration, Commentary, Exposition, and Paraphrase on the Book of Common Prayer and Administration of the Sacraments [etc. etc.] … By Paul Wright, D. D.– F.S.A … Embellished with a numerous Set of elegant Copper-Plate Engravings, more highly finished than those given with any other Work of the Kind whatever …

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First edition thus, rare, published in 36 weekly parts, each originally accompanied with an illustration, and now correctly bound according to the complicated ‘Directions to the Binder’ at the end. Wright’s exhaustive compilation, with notes and commentary on each page, assembled calendars, the book of common prayer, the psalms, forms of prayer, constitutions and canons, and two versions of the metrical psalms (Sternold and Hopkins, and Tate and Brady) … The illustrations were equally copious.

ESTC shows six copies: BL, Canterbury Cathedral (wanting subscriber’s list), Queen’s College Oxford, Bodley, University of London: and Huntington.

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