A Dictionary of Spanish Painters, comprehending simply that part of their biography immediately connected with the Arts; from the Fourteenth Century to the Eighteenth.

London, C. O’Neil, 1833-4.

Two volumes, large 8vo; pp. xv, [1], 280; [2], 308, with four engraved plates; plates lightly foxed, else a very good set in contemporary pebble-grain morocco, gilt tooled panels to a Spanish design, flat spine gilt, all edges gilt; a family copy – ownership inscriptions of Arthur O’Neil to the fly leaves, library bookplates to front pastedowns, a few unobtrusive stamps.


US $491€399

Make an enquiry

First edition. The exact identity of the (female) author remains uncertain, but this is a readable and detailed account of the artists of Spain, beginning with a list of the various schools of painters (Valencia, Madrid, Seville), before moving onto individual artists, arranged alphabetically. The biographies contain notes on training, influences and style, and most famous works, and each volume concludes with a list of paintings and their locations.

You may also be interested in...


[BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER.] Il Libro delle Preghiere publiche ed Amministrazione de Sacramenti, ed altri Riti e Cerimonie della Chiesa, secondo l’Uso della Chiesa Anglicana; insieme col Saltero over i Salmi di David, come hanno da esser recitati nelle Chiese. E la Forma e Modo di fare, ordinare e consacrare Vescovi, Presbiteri e Diaconi.

First edition of the first translation of the Book of Common Prayer into Italian. The project was begun by Edward Browne while chaplain to Sir John Finch in Constantinople, perhaps incorporating an earlier, unpublished translation by William Bedell (the manuscript being listed in Griffiths’ Bibliography of the Book of Common Prayer as Italian 1). Back in London, the work was completed by the Italian émigré merchant Giovan-Battista Capello (John Capell), a friend of Hobbes.

Read more


The theatre of war in the Kingdom of Bohemia, drawn from the survey of J. C. Muller Captain Engineer to the Emperor: to which is annexed the Duchy of Silesia and Marquisates of Moravia and Lusatia, compiled from the German maps. By Thomas Jefferys, geographer to his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.

This map, issued at the beginning of the Seven Years’ War, illustrates the route taken by Frederick the Great’s Prussian forces against those of Saxony and Prussia, up to the opening of siege operations against Prague. On 18 June 1757, Count von Daun, in attempting to raise this siege, overpowered Frederick’s forces at the battle of Kolin. It was the first time that Prussian king had been defeated on the field. Most of the land fighting of the Seven Years’ War, which ended in 1763, took place in the territories depicted in this map.

Read more