Articles of impeachment of high treason and other high crimes … against Thomas Earl of Danby Lord High Treasurer of England …

[London, 1678].

4to, pp. 7, [1]; drop-head title; one manuscript correction to p. 5; a very good in modern brown cloth.

£100

Approximately:
US $138€115

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Articles of impeachment of high treason and other high crimes … against Thomas Earl of Danby Lord High Treasurer of England …

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One of several contemporary printings, priority uncertain. Thomas Osborne, then Lord Danby and later Duke of Leeds, led the government from 1674 until 1678, when he was impeached for, effectively, having carried out government policy. He was voted guilty by the Commons but the Lords were still in debate when Parliament was dissolved; he was forced to resign in the new Parliament but was pardoned by the King.

Wing A3858A.

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