Caution recommended in the use and application of scripture language. A sermon preached July 15, 1777, in the Cathedral Church of Carlisle, at the visitation of the Right Reverend Edmund, Lord Bishop of Carlisle.

Cambridge, printed by J. Archdeacon for T. & J. Merrill (and others), 1777.

4to, pp. [iv], 8; title and final page slightly soiled, a few small ink spots to the title; disbound.

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Caution recommended in the use and application of scripture language. A sermon preached July 15, 1777, in the Cathedral Church of Carlisle, at the visitation of the Right Reverend Edmund, Lord Bishop of Carlisle.

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First edition. A sermon (on 2 Peter iii, vv. 15–16) preached by Paley, author of the celebrated Evidences of Christianity (1785), at the invitation of Edmund Law, Bishop of Carlisle. ‘Paley’s connection with the Law family greatly advanced his clerical career. He regularly spent vacations with John Law while they were Cambridge fellows, and they once met John Wilkes on one of their excursions to Bath and enjoyed an evening with him. Paley’s “long and faithful friendship” with Law was acknowledged in the dedication to Horae Paulinae (1790). In 1777 Paley was invited to preach the visitation sermon in Carlisle Cathedral for Edmund Law’ (Oxford DNB).

COPAC records two copies only (British Library, Cambridge), NUC two (Yale, Library of Congress).

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