Storia della economia pubblica in Italia, ossia epilogo critico degli economisti italiani, preceduto da un’ introduzione …

Lugano, Tipografia della Svizzera Italiana, 1849.

8vo, pp. 272; occasional spotting; uncut in the original printed wrappers, extremities chipped in places, tear to rear cover (traces of tape repair).

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Third edition (first, Lugano, 1829) of a companion piece to Custodi’s monumental Scrittori classici italiani di economia politica, published in 50 volumes, 1803–16. With this work Pecchio supplies a biographical account of each author, as well as a historical introduction, chapters devoted to the Tuscan and the Neapolitan schools, and one chapter on the economic reforms of the eighteenth century. ‘Though written with a strong national bias, it may on the whole be reckoned a pretty fair, as well as a rapid and spirited, sketch of the works of the Italian economists’ (McCulloch, p. 31).

Cossa p. 64, 67; Einaudi 4339; this edition not in Goldsmiths’ or Kress.

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