Tabula processum seu ordinem ultimi divini et criminalis judicii exhibens; cum adjunct eiusdem brevi demonstratione ex Biblicis textibus et rationibus, quibus figurae undecim tabulam illustrantes suo quaeque loco inseruntur, additurque cantio germanica, quae eandem totam continet.

Cleves, Gerhard Verstegen, 1625.

Small 4to, pp. [iv], 82, with 11 engraved plates and a folding letterpress table; without the five-leaf German appendix ‘Ein geistlich Lied’ (see below); some browning and foxing, particularly towards end, title backed at time of binding, one plate and final leaf strengthened at inner margin, light stain in margin of one plate; early nineteenth-century English straight-grain dark blue morocco gilt, edges gilt and gauffered.

£1800

Approximately:
US $2353€1991

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Tabula processum seu ordinem ultimi divini et criminalis judicii exhibens; cum adjunct eiusdem brevi demonstratione ex Biblicis textibus et rationibus, quibus figurae undecim tabulam illustrantes suo quaeque loco inseruntur, additurque cantio germanica, quae eandem totam continet.

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First edition of this strange and rare treatise on the Apocalypse and the Last Judgement, illustrated with dramatic plates by Gillis van Scheyndel. It is the first book printed at Cleves in the Lower Rhine region of northwestern Germany. At the head of each plate appears a letter (or letters) which serve as a key to the relevant part of the text.

The present copy is without the five-leaf ‘cantio Germanica’ announced on the title, which has its own German title-page ‘Ein geistlich Lied von dem Procesz des jüngsten Gerichts’ dated 1625 and is not obviously related to the Latin treatise which precedes it.

Provenance: quite possibly George Spencer-Churchill (1766–1840), Marquess of Blandford and later fifth Duke of Marlborough (see sale catalogue of the Whiteknights library, Evans, 26 June 1819, lot 3335, in ‘blue morocco’); Henry White (1761–1836), clergyman and friend of Samuel Johnson, with his ownership inscription dated 14 July 1819 on front free endpaper; subsequently in the library of the Barons Harlech.

Brunet IV 469; Graesse V 186 (‘ouvrage bizarre’); VD17 23:631970D (recording two copies: Göttingen and Wolfenbüttel). OCLC records five copies only: Amsterdam (two), the British Library, the Huntington, and Utrecht.

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