RARE MEDIEVAL ENCYCLOPAEDIA

Aureum roasariu[m] theologie ad sente[n]tia[rum] quattuor libros pariformiter quadripertitu[m], ex doctrina doctoris Subtilis, suo[rum]q[ue] sequaciu[m] Sa[n]cto[rum] etia[m] Thome Aq[ui]natis Bonave[n]ture q[ue] ac multor[um] solido[rum] doctor[rum] …[– Secu[n]dus … – Tertius… – Quartus liber rosarii theologie aurei ad Sente[n]tia[rum]…].

Hagenau, Henri Gran, 9 September 1503 [– 14 May 1504; – 2 August 1507; – 2 December 1508].

4 vols in 2, folio, ff. I: [167, 1 (blank)], II: [250], III: [165 (1 blank)], IV: [179 (lacking final blank)]; I: a-e8, f6, g-l8, m-v8/8/6, x-y8 (y8 blank), II: a-d8, e6, f-l8, m-F8/8/6, G-K8, III: a-b8, c6, d-f8, g6, h-i8, k6, l-n8, o6, p-q8, r6, s8, t6, v-x8, y10 (y10 blank), IV: a-b8, c-y8/6, z-A8, B7 (without blank B8); gothic type in two columns; dampstains from edges, a little marginal worming, loss (not affecting text) to I: a1 and II: K8; contemporary ?Augsburg binding of roan over bevelled wooden boards, blind-tooled panels with two rolls (one vegetable, the other with geometric strapwork) with one tool interspersed, upper boards titled in blind with large gothic letters, formerly with centre- and corner-pieces (some brass studs remaining), vestiges of clasps, spine lined with manuscript waste on parchment; cover worn with losses, hinges split, one tailband attached at one end only; provenance: SS. Peter and Paul, Weyarn, Bavaria (printed label to upper pastedowns, with ink shelfmark); Royal Library, Munich (eighteenth-century manuscript duplicate note to upper pastedowns, ink stamps to first and last leaves of each volume); Maison Saint-Augustin, Enghien, Belgium (ink stamp to titles verso, early twentieth-century printed label to upper pastedowns, pencil shelfmark repeated on titles and spines).

£4500

Approximately:
US $5614€5315

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Aureum roasariu[m] theologie ad sente[n]tia[rum] quattuor libros pariformiter quadripertitu[m], ex doctrina doctoris Subtilis, suo[rum]q[ue] sequaciu[m] Sa[n]cto[rum] etia[m] Thome Aq[ui]natis Bonave[n]ture q[ue] ac multor[um] solido[rum] doctor[rum] …[– Secu[n]dus … – Tertius… – Quartus liber rosarii theologie aurei ad Sente[n]tia[rum]…].

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First edition, rarely found complete, of this scarce late-medieval philosophical encyclopaedia; an attractively unsophisticated copy.

The Hungarian Franciscan Pelbartus de Themesvar (c. 1435–1504, his birthplace now Timişoara, Romania), who spent much of his ministry at St. John monastery in Buda, was the author of a best-selling series of model sermons, published from the late 1490s in numerous editions. His Rosarium, however, a theoretical work, was only published four times, and the other three editions after ours only saw the light in the 1580s and 1590s. It aims at unifying the whole realm of philosophy/theology in a systematic series of alphabetically-ordered topics – effectively producing an ambitious encyclopaedia, a single and complete reference for all that relates to metaphysics, logic, ethics, and theology. On the other hand, the work reflects another, complementary genre: as the title states, it is conceived as a commentary of Peter Lombard’s Sententiae (also in four books), one of the most influential texts of the Middle Ages. It is very likely that the Rosarium was composed as a result of and complement to Pelbartus’s teaching: the chronology points to the years from 1483 onwards, when Perbaldus was active in the Buda studium; its opening adhortatio studiorum addresses aspirant learners, and the propositions strive for brevity, clarity and simplification. The text mines dozens of sources, from Aristotle and Averroes to Augustine, Aquinas, Bonaventure, Gregory, Albert the Great, as well as many other texts of the Scholastic tradition. Readers can evince a doctrinal preference for the Scotist school, and possibly identify, to some extent, the resources available in a monastic library in Buda at the end of the 15th century.

Adams P-552; VD16 P-1158; Németh, Hungarica H-1586; Panzer VII, 68, 16 and 69, 18.

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