Woerterbuch der japanischen Sprache.

Erste Lieferung [all published]. Vienna, in Commission bei Carl Gerold und Sohn, 1851.

Large 4to, pp. xi, (1), 80, and with 79 litho plates depicting Kanji characters; a fine, uncut copy in the original publisher’s printed and decorated cream wrappers, edges slightly frayed.

£650

Approximately:
US $828€741

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First edition of the first Japanese – German dictionary, which gives the Kanji (Chinese) characters together with the Katakana sound. On facing pages are printed the German (expansive) and English (shorter) translations or definitions together with the transliterated version. The work was handsomely printed by the Armenian Mecharist Order, noted for their expertise in oriental printing. Only this first part was published; a continuation was abandoned due to the cost of printing.

August Pfizmaier (1808-1887) was an accomplished linguist who initially excelled in Turkish, Japanese, Mandarin, Arabic and Persian. He soon specialized in Japanese, translating a number of works into German.

Zaunmüller, 212; Alt-Japan-Katalog, 1142.

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