THE BATTLE OF ALCAZAR

The second Part of the Booke of Batailles, fought in our present Age: taken out of the best Authors and Writers in sundrie Languages. Published for the profit of those that practise armes, and for the pleasure of such as love to be harmlesse hearers of bloudie broiles.

At London, Printed for Giles Cawood. 1587.

4to, ff. [4], 94; title within a woodcut border, woodcut initials; small repair to upper inner margin of first few leaves, else a very good copy in modern panelled calf.

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The second Part of the Booke of Batailles, fought in our present Age: taken out of the best Authors and Writers in sundrie Languages. Published for the profit of those that practise armes, and for the pleasure of such as love to be harmlesse hearers of bloudie broiles.

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First edition, scarce. Polemon had been commissioned by Henry Bynneman to compile a compendium on modern warfare which was duly published as All the famous Battels that have been fought in our Age in 1578. It covered from the beginning of the century up to the Battle of Lepanto in 1572. Nine years later, Polemon (which may be a pseudonym) followed up with a Second Part (really a completely independent work) for a different publisher, covering more recent battles fought 1562-1585, drawing this time on Popellinière, Stratius, Contarini, Comes and others. The Preface laments that the first part ‘was so maimed, mangled, and marred by the Printers’ that he refused to put his name to it, and notes that he has provided new accounts of two battles, including Lepanto, from better sources.

The Second Part of the Booke of Batailles is now best known as the main source for George Peele’s play The Battle of Alcazar (published 1594), the first major treatment of a moorish character on the Elizabethan stage and an important dramatic precursor for Titus Andronicus and Othello. The battle, a civil conflict between Muly Mahamet and Abdelmelec of Morocco, is covered on ff. 63-83 here.

STC 20090.

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ARCHIVE OF SCOTTISH SOLDIER TULLOCH, James Dundas Gregorie.

Small archive relating to his military career.

An interesting set of documents tracing the military career of James Dundas Gregorie Tulloch (1804-1879), from his initial struggles to obtain a commission to his promotion to Major under Queen Victoria. Tulloch was the younger brother of the statistician Major-General Sir Alexander Murray Tulloch (1803-1864), famous for his controversial report on the Crimean War. He served in India, Burma and North America, and rose to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. The collection includes a most interesting letter written by Tulloch around 1828, providing a potted autobiography. Having detailed his studies at the 'Academy of Perth' and then at Edinburgh, where he attended 'the Natural History Class', Tulloch describes his frustrated attempts to obtain a commission in the army, in spite of support, he claims, from Lord Viscount Melville, Sir John Hope and Sir Herbert Taylor. Only able to obtain a position as a volunteer in the 45th Regiment, he trained at Chatham before sailing to Calcutta 'in a private ship at a very heavy expense', only to find that his contact there, Colonel Macdonald, had died. This letter is complemented by a small account book kept by Tulloch when serving as a volunteer in Calcutta in 1828 and 1829, recording sums spent on, for example, wine, haircuts, boots, chairs, servants, billiards, a grass cutter, tailoring, 'shoeing and bleeding pony', and 'Hindoos wages'. Letters to Tulloch include one from his brother Alexander Murray offering him the post of Staff Officer of Pensioners in North America in 1849. Contents:
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BRADFORD, William.

Sketches of the country, character, and costume, in Portugal and Spain, made during the campaign, and on the route of the British Army, in 1808 and 1809. Engraved and coloured from the drawings by the Rev. William Bradford, A.B. . . . With incidental illustration, and appropriate descriptions, of each subject.

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