L’heureuse benediction des maisons.

Vannes, N. De Lamarzelle, [c.1840].

Single sheet (430x261mm), woodcut with text below within decorative border; edges slightly frayed, but otherwise clean and fresh.

£250

Approximately:
US $314€279

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A wonderful devotional broadside printed in the Breton town of Vannes, comprising a crude woodcut depiction of the scene at Calvary, signed ‘Desloge’ at the base, with two cantiques spirituels. The image is identical to one that appeared in a similar publication, also undated, that appeared in Mourtain in Normandy, printed by Lebel; the surrounding border and the text, however, differ, and we are unable to establish priority. Similar images, appearing under the same title, were not uncommon in the mid nineteenth century in provincial France, but survivals are very rare. Lamarzelle was the publisher of numerous works, both religious and secular, throughout the nineteenth century. Nicolas de Lamarzelle, the present printer, was active between 1835 and 1849.

Neither the present version nor the Mourtain one recorded by OCLC.

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