Patriot and shoemaker

The life and opinions of Thomas Preston, patriot and shoemaker; containing much that is curious, much that is useful, more that is true, and a great deal more, (perhaps) than is expected!

London, printed for the Author by A. Seale, 1817.

8vo, pp. 37, [1] blank; occasional foxing, but otherwise clean and fresh; in recent red cloth boards, title in gilt on spine.

£375

Approximately:
US $515€439

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The life and opinions of Thomas Preston, patriot and shoemaker; containing much that is curious, much that is useful, more that is true, and a great deal more, (perhaps) than is expected!

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Only edition, rare, of this short autobiography by the Spencean radical Thomas Preston (1774-1850), published in the aftermath of the Spa Fields riots of December 1816, of which he was one of the principal instigators. Telling of his parentless childhood, business and person failures, itinerant working life, and entry into the world of London debating clubs, The life and opinions is a case study of radicalisation, from the Spencean Philanthropists in 1811, to trial for high treason in 1816 (a charge from which he was only saved by the involvement of an agent provocateur).

Library Hub and WorldCat record copies at BL, Oxford, Cambridge; UCLA, and Newberry.

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