Remarks on Dr. Price’s observations on the nature of civil liberty, &c.

London, for G. Kearsley, 1776.

8vo, pp. [4], 76; title and last page lightly toned; a very good copy in modern quarter calf over marbled boards, gilt lettering-piece to spine, vellum tips.

£550

Approximately:
US $671€616

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First edition, one of two issues published in the same year. A reply to and critical commentary on Richard Price’s discussion of American independence, reaffirming the English claim to sovereignty over America. Possibly penned by a member of Hume’s circle, the pamphlet was judged to be ‘written with less invective, and more decency, candour and moderation, than have lately appeared in the productions on that side of the American dispute’ (Sabin).

Adams 76-129a; Sabin 24090. See Jessop, p. 122, for the other issue.

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