THE APOSTLE OF LIBERTY

A discourse on occasion of the death of Dr. Price; delivered at Hackney, on Sunday, May 1, 1791.

London, for J. Johnson, 1791.

8vo, pp. [2], 45, [7, Catalogue of books written by Dr. Priestley], lacking the half-title; a very good copy in recent boards.

£550

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A discourse on occasion of the death of Dr. Price; delivered at Hackney, on Sunday, May 1, 1791.

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First edition of this moving tribute to the philosopher, demographer, and political radical Richard Price (1723-1791), by his close friend Joseph Priestley. ‘The most august assembly in the world, by which I wish to be understood the National Assembly of France, have justly styled him the apostle of liberty’, Priestley writes (p. 8). The work ends with a short biography of Price and an account of his publications.

Crook TR/49; ESTC T31979.

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