The Phœnix; or, a choice Collection of Riddles and Charades …

London: Printed for J. Harris and Son … [c. 1820].

8vo., pp. [2, advertisments], 38, with a title-page vignette of a phoenix and 16 half-page woodcut illustrations (each with four vignettes), all with attractive contemporary hand-colouring; a very good copy in the original yellow printed card wrappers, somewhat dusty, spine a little worn; ownership inscriptions of George Jackson dated 1822 to endpapers, with three manuscript charades in his hand.

£750

Approximately:
US $965€859

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First edition thus, a very scarce illustrated collection of riddles and charades, abridged from an earlier Newbery publication. The charming illustrations throughout, new to this edition, make the work a sort of children’s emblem book. Written solutions are also included at the end. A contemporary (juvenile) reader has added charmingly naïve charades for ‘plate-rack’, ‘lark-spur’ and ‘Frankfort’ in manuscript.

Moon, Harris 696 (listing copies at V&A and UCLA); Gumuchian 4515. COPAC adds Cambridge.

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