Topologie d’une cité fantôme.

Paris, Éditions de Minuit, 1976.

8vo, pp. 203, one of 80 copies printed on Alfa mousse; in fine condition, uncut and unopened, in the original printed wrappers.

£250

Approximately:
US $310€276

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Topologie d’une cité fantôme.

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First edition: a kind of intellectual detective story in which the reader becomes a collaborator in the solution of a crime as much his own creation as it is the author’s.

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