Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

1857.

Albumen print, 9½ x 11⅞ inches (24.3 x 30.2 cm.); signed Robertson & Beato photog, titled (cropped), and dated 1857 in the negative; titled in pencil on the reverse Church of the Sepulchre and surrounding buildings before restoration of Great Dome in 1868-69.

£500 + VAT

Approximately:
US $695€578

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