Rouse’s Scraps of Sussex. [London] Fulham, drawn and published by James Rouse, drawn and engraved by Elizabeth Rouse, [1817-1825].

Folio, 124 aquatint views on 20 sheets (plate size 322 x 215 mm), complete, a few sheets very occasionally lightly spotted, one a little browned; loosely kept in later cloth backed folder.

£950

Approximately:
US $1277€1051

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Rouse’s Scraps of Sussex. [London] Fulham, drawn and published by James Rouse, drawn and engraved by Elizabeth Rouse, [1817-1825].

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An uncommon set of charming topographical aquatint views. James Rouse (1773-1840) worked together with his wife, Elizabeth; on one sheet he calls himself a ‘drawing master’. The views show landscapes but delight more often in capturing rural life, cottages, small villages, churches, ruins, abbeys, roman pavements, etc, and are all populated with figures. There is an early view of the Brighton Pavilion and two views of the Brighton Royal Stables. There are views of the many castle, such as Arundel Castle (several views), Hurstmonceaux Castle, Pevensey Castle, Knap Castle, Hasting Castle (several views), Goring Castle, Bodiam Castle (2), etc.; and there are several country house depicted, such as Findon Place (seat of Mrs. Richardson), Cowdray House (2), Brambletye House, Earl of Ashburnham’s House, and Crowhurst Park.

The measurements of the individual views vary between 50 x 70 mm. and 70 x 120 mm. all have captions giving location: 10 sheets have four views; 2 sheets have six views; 5 sheets have eight views; 2 sheets have ten views, and 1 sheet contains 12 delightful oval views.

In the late 1830s James Rouse published an expanded series of lithographs based on these aquatint views.

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